Mountain Valley 101: The Water, the Brand and the History

Every drop of Mountain Valley comes from a single, natural spring source that originates deep within the earth's surface.

Where does Mountain Valley Spring Water come from?

Every drop of Mountain Valley water comes from a single, natural spring source that originates deep within the earth's surface. The spring is located within 2,000 acres of protected land approximately 12 miles from Hot Springs National Park Arkansas. We bottle Mountain Valley at the spring site.

What's in Mountain Valley Spring Water that makes it different?

Mountain Valley has a very pleasing natural mineral content, consisting mainly of calcium, potassium and magnesium. However, Mountain Valley is sodium-free according to FDA standards. A full mineral analysis is available on the www.mountainvalleyspring.com website.

How did Mountain Valley get started?

Mountain Valley has a very pleasing natural mineral content, consisting mainly of calcium, potassium, and magnesium.

The first known owner of the property containing the Mountain Valley spring was Benjamin Lockett. Mr. Lockett and his son Enoch sold some of the water locally around Hot Springs until it became known as “Lockett's Spring Water.” Dr. Peter Greene, an Arkansas pharmacist, began to market the water and then changed its name to “Mountain Valley” (after the name of the nearby small community) in 1871. Dr. Greene purchased the land in 1872, began to improve the spring site, and gave Mountain Valley its start.

Why isn’t Mountain Valley called a “mineral water”?

In its early days, Mountain Valley was indeed sold as a mineral water. More recently, federal regulators set a uniform standard for the level of total dissolved solids (TDS) required for a "mineral water" designation in the U.S. At approximately 217 parts per million, Mountain Valley's TDS falls below the 250 parts per million threshold.

How do we make Mountain Valley Sparkling Water?

Mountain Valley Sparkling is simply our award-winning spring water injected with CO2. We selected a light carbonation level so that Mountain Valley Sparkling would be a perfect meal accompaniment or a refreshing treat that doesn't make one feel full.

Spring waters come from some underground formation through which water naturally moves to the earth's surface.

What are the differences between spring water and other types of water on the market?

Some of the most heavily advertised waters on the market are “purified waters,” meaning they come from municipal (tap water) sources and are put through substantial processing treatments. (Don't be fooled by pictures of mountains or bodies of water on the labels of purified waters!) Spring waters come from some underground formation through which water naturally moves to the earth's surface.

Spring water must, by law, be collected at the source or via a borehole that taps the underground formation. Every spring is a little different, depending upon water depth, rock formations, etc.

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